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Sun Microsystems Sun Redefines Storage for the Net Economy

PALO ALTO, CA - June 14, 2000 - Sun Microsystems, Inc. today continued its drive for market share in the rapidly growing $30 billion plus network storage market. Armed with open, network-based and massively scalable servers in the mid 1990s, Sun attacked the traditional mainframe market. Sun is now poised to address the same customer frustrations and technology limitations with an innovative, new approach to storage. Today, Sun unveiled a host of new systems, sophisticated local and remote data protection software, a full suite of customer care services and support programs, and a number of key storage partner programs and open standards endorsements.

Sun's new approach has three basic components:
  • a breakthrough modular building block disk storage system, the Sun StorEdge[tm] T3 array;
  • data protection software that allows companies to manage their data from any location on multivendor arrays;
  • a full suite of storage-specific services aimed at ensuring total data integrity, ranging from 24x7 predictive monitoring and preemptive response to capacity planning, performance tuning and architecture/prototype/implementation consulting.

"IDC estimates that the disk storage systems market will reach $46 billion by 2003, up more than $16 billion from 1999," said John McArthur, Vice President of Storage Research at IDC. "Today's announcement represents a significant enhancement to Sun's Networked Storage vision. As one of the leading suppliers of enterprise servers with a renewed focus on storage, Sun is increasingly well positioned to compete for networked storage opportunities."
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Sun Redefines Storage for the Net Economy

Lightwave Communications Brings Consolidation And Control to Wall Street
Serial Attached SCSI
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Squeak! - Why are Most Analysts Wrong About Solid State Disks?
read the article - Why are Most Analysts  Wrong About Solid State Disks?
Most analysts and editors of other computer publications don't really understand the solid state disk market.

They show their ignorance and naivete by prefacing every discussion of SSDs with a superficial analysis which compares the cost per byte of storage between flash and hard disk drives. That's the wrong answer to the wrong question. And it's far removed from why the SSD market is racing to become a multi billion dollar market seemingly in blithe ignorance of the cost per byte proposition.

This article tells you what's important to users and the main applications in which SSDs are already being used and new applications where they will be used in the next 3 years. ...read the article, Solid State Disks
Sun Microsystems Storage for the Net Economy

June 14 10:00 am PST - Webcast As data moves to the center of the Net Economy, where does storage fit in? Join Ed Zander and other key Sun executives on June 14th for a must-attend event on the future of network storage. You'll get a firsthand look at Sun's vision, technology, and commitment to writing the next chapter of dot-com success: Storage for the Net Economy.
Lightwave Communications Lightwave Communications Brings Consolidation And Control to Wall Street

MILFORD, Conn.- (BUSINESS WIRE)- June 12, 2000 - Lightwave Communications Inc. the industry leader in console management solutions introduces the Trading Floor Switch; the first keyboard/mouse switch developed especially for the trading desk. The Trading Floor Switch allows a single Sun-compatible keyboard and mouse to control two Sun and two PS/2-compatible computers. Valuable desk space is conserved by using a single keyboard and mouse to control the CPUs. Video signals are not switched by the Trading Floor Switch so that visual market data is not compromised.

Keyboard and mouse emulation is supplied at all times to all attached computers regardless of switch position. There is no interruption of operation caused by a CPU detecting the absence of a keyboard. The Trading Floor Switch stores keyboard status (Caps Lock, Num Lock, etc.) for each CPU and restores the current status each time the computer is selected. The Trading Floor Switch is compact, only 4"x4"x1", and consists of a circuitry module that can easily be mounted off the desktop and a wired remote control that attaches to the keyboard for easy use. Users can select the computer to be controlled by the touch of a button, the selected CPU indicated by an LED above the respective button. The Trading Floor Switch requires no external power.

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